Those Who Come, Will Hear

Those Who Come, Will Hear

Simon Plouffe | 
Canada |
 2017 | 
77 minutes

THIS SCREENING IS PART OF THE JUSTICE FORUM SERIES AND WILL INCLUDE A POST-FILM DISCUSSION.

“When a word is offered it never dies. Those who come will hear. Menutakuaki aimun, apu nita nipumakak. Tshika petamuat nikan tshe takushiniht.” -JOSÉPHINE BACON (INNU POET)

Simon Plouffe’s atmospheric and immersive film offers an opportunity to explore the musicality and cultural significance of many Indigenous languages, all of which are at risk of disappearing. Contemporary speakers of a variety of languages in Northern Quebec including: Abenaki (language from Odanak); Atikamekw (language from Manawan); Innu (language from Mani-Utenam); Inuttitut (language from Inukjuak); Kanien’keháka (Mohawk) (language from Kahnawake); and Naskapi (language from Kawawachicamach) share their knowledge, struggles, and passion to protect their ancestral oral traditions.

Those Who Come, Will Hear makes the case that simple activities such as singing hymns at church, hosting a radio show, or teaching children can become radical acts of language revitalization and decolonization. -SC

 

Filmmaker

Simon Plouffe

Hailing from Rouyn-Noranda, Simon Plouffe lives and works in Montreal, Quebec. His experience as a sound mixer leads him to explore sonic universes both within experimentation and design. His first documentary Others’ Gold (2011), has been shown in fifteen international festivals (RIDM, Dok.Fest, Guadalajara, Big Sky) and has received a Merit Award for Advocacy at Montana CINE Int. Film Fest, an honorable mention for Excellent Storytelling at the WIFF, and the Silver Lei Award at the Honolulu Film Awards. His second feature-length documentary Those Who Come, Will Hear (2017), will have its world premiere at the 56th edition of Ann Arbor Film Festival in 2018. He is currently developing a documentary on blindness caused by armed conflicts.

Screening With
Louise BigEagle | 
Canada |
 2017 | 
6 minutes
Justice Forum Panelist

Louise BigEagle

Louise BigEagle is a First Nations filmmaker and recent graduate of the University of Regina (BA Film Studies). Her most recent short films are I Am a Boy, about a young boy who attended the Regina Indian Industrial School, and Sounds of the Sundance, a composed sound work dedicated to those who attended residential school

Justice Forum Panelist

Marny Point

Marny Point is from the Musqueam band, of the Coast Salish people. Marny completed both her degrees: a Bachelor of Education & Masters of Educational Technology at UBC. Marny is a Lecturer in the First Nations and Endangered Languages program, teaching the intermediate level of the Coast Salish traditional Musqueam language course, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓.  She understands how the connection to Indigenous languages; gives value, honor and a sense of identity, which cements Native Indigenous, people in place and culture.