Letter from Masanjia

Letter from Masanjia

Saturday, May 5, 2018 - 2:00pm
Trailer(s)
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BC DOC

Leon Lee | 
Canada |
 2018 | 
77 minutes

THIS SCREENING IS PART OF THE JUSTICE FORUM SERIES AND WILL INCLUDE A POST-FILM DISCUSSION.

When Julie Keith from Damascus, Oregon found a mysterious letter hidden in her Halloween decorations, she never imagined that it would lead to international scandal, and the closure of a notorious forced labour camp in China. The plea for help, penned by a prisoner of the Masanjia labour camp, detailed the appalling living conditions and torture practices taking place in the facility. As news of Julie’s unusual discovery spread in the international media, a soft-spoken engineer and Falun Gong practitioner named Sun Yi came forward as the author of the letter. Although no longer imprisoned, Sun Yi still suffered from the constant fear of retaliation from the Chinese government. In spite of this, he bravely set forth on a journey to share his story with the help of Vancouver filmmaker Leon Lee.

Filmed largely in secret, and incorporating striking animated sequences, Letter from Masanjia uncovers the reality of China’s police state and the true meaning behind the ominous phrase “re-education through labour". Following his Peabody Award-winning exposé Human Harvest, director Leon Lee continues to expose human rights abuses in China with this message in a bottle thriller. -MS

Filmmaker

Leon Lee

Leon Lee brings China’s human rights issues into focus for audiences around the world. His debut documentary Human Harvest (2014) exposed China’s murderous and illegal organ trade, and it has been broadcast in over 25 countries, viewed by millions, and received a Peabody Award for Documentary, and an Association of International Broadcasters Award for Investigative Journalism. Human Harvest has helped affect public policy in countries such as the US, Britain, Canada, and Taiwan, screening in parliaments and governments across the globe. Lee’s recent documentary Avenues of Escape (2016) aired on the CBC Documentary Channel and was the recipient of four Leo Awards including Best Feature Documentary. His goal as a filmmaker is to shine a light on highly-personal true stories that resonate universally across language and culture, giving a voice to the voiceless.