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After many years as a proud part of East Vancouver, we're moving our office. DOXA, along with the PuSh International Performing Arts Festival, Music on Main, and Touchstone Theatre, will be settling into our new home at 750 Hamilton Street (right next to the main CBC Building) this month.

 

This is a significant change for DOXA, but we won't forget our grassroots origins, or our dedication to the art of documentary. Our new digs will situate us in the centre of the action, close to venues, and the new cultural precinct in downtown Vancouver.

 

Our phones will be offline from Dec 11-14 so if you would like to reach us, please email us. Any regular mail or parcels can be directed to our new address:

 

#110 - 750 Hamilton Street

Vancouver, BC V6B 2R5

If you didn't have a chance to attend DOXA's CURIO fundraiser on November 14, you can still support DOXA while getting your hands on some great certificates, trips, concert tickets, and much more.  We will have more than 40 items available online through eBay. Auction items end in batches between November 22-26, 2014.

Click here to see the current list of items.

Please join DOXA board and staff at this year's Annual General Meeting on Monday, November 24th, 2014 at 7PM at the DOXA office.

We will review the programming and administrative highlights of the previous year, enjoy some refreshments and welcome our new Board of Directors. If you purchased a membership at the 2014 DOXA Festival, you are a voting member and we welcome your attendance. With the upcoming move to DOXA's new office in downtown Vancouver, we would also like to invite you help us celebrate and say goodbye to our Commercial Drive location, a place we have called home for the past ten years.

DETAILS
Monday, November 24, 2014 | 7:00PM
1726 Commercial Drive, Suite 5 (at 1st Avenue) Vancouver, BC
*Please note that the current DOXA office is not wheelchair accessible.

 

Vancouver, BC – DOXA Documentary Film Festival is pleased to announce Best of DOXA, featuring an encore screening of Orlando von Einsiedel's Virunga (Winner of the 2014 DOXA Feature Documentary Award), and Johanna Hamilton's revelatory new film 1971.

In the verdant depths of Eastern Congo stands Virunga National Park, a UNESCO world heritage site, and one of the most bio-diverse places in the world. Virunga is a place that almost defies description, from the deep scarlet lava lakes of Nyiragongo volcano, to the grasslands spotted with antelope, elephants, lions, and hippos. It is also home to the world’s only remaining population of wild mountain gorillas. But even in this most beautiful of places, human corruption and greed threatens destruction and death. A group of fiercely dedicated park rangers — including a Belgian conservationist, and a ranger-turned-substitute parent for a group of orphan gorillas — stand guard over the park and its wild inhabitants. Einsiedel’s film is documentary on a grand scale, as befits the extraordinary place it depicts. But more importantly, it is a remarkable portrait of a group of people, united in a common purpose, and a critical reminder of the courage required to protect the most rare and extraordinary creatures that walk the earth. Virunga screens at 6:30PM at the Cinematheque.

Long before Edward Snowden or Chelsea Manning were turning out state secrets, a group of ordinary citizens were pulling back the rug to expose the dirty tricks of Hoover’s FBI. In 1971, a group of eight ordinary people (college professors, activists, and a cab driver) formed an elaborate plan to break into an FBI field office in Media, Pennsylvania and liberate whatever documents they could find. They got far more than they bargained for. Outlined in grey government language were plans to subvert the left-leaning elements in the nation; everything from paying mailmen to spy on university professors, to plans to infiltrate the Black Panthers and the Boy Scouts. One document detailed plans to send an agent to look into the fact that a Boy Scout troop had pen pals behind the iron curtain. Despite attempts to track down the people responsible for the theft (at one point more than 200 agents were combing Media, Pennsylvania), the perpetrators were never discovered. Until now…With recreations, candid interviews, and some truly startling reveals, the people behind the story talk about, not only the break in, but more importantly, the motivation and meaning behind it. 1971 Screens at 8:45PM at the Cinematheque.

Virunga
Tuesday, June 10, 2014, 6:30PM @ The Cinematheque (1131 Howe Street, Vancouver)

1971
Tuesday, June 10, 2014, 8:45PM @ The Cinematheque (1131 Howe St, Vancouver)

More information available at: http://doxafestival.ca/bod

Tickets are available online at www.doxafestival.ca. For further information, call DOXA at 604.646.3200. DOXA is presented by The Documentary Media society, a Vancouver-based non-profit, charitable society.

 

Did you miss seeing a film at the festival because it was sold out? Or maybe you simply couldn't make it to the screening.

We want to hear your suggestions on films to bring back for an additional screening as part of our BEST OF DOXA series.

Click here if you don't see the form below to send us your suggestions.

Vancouver, BC – The 2014 DOXA Documentary Film Festival concluded with the Canadian premiere of Brent Hodge’s film A Brony Tale. The Vancouver Playhouse was filled with 8ft. tall ponies, laughter and bronies galore! The gala event also saw the announcement of the 2014 DOXA Award winners.

The Short Documentary Award was given to Jana Mináriková’s film Homo Ciris. Jury members Laura U. Marks, Samir Gandesha and Catrina Longmuir stated: “In a respectful and whimsical way the filmmaker follows her subject deep into his passion and then spins it out into a fabulous fiction. Watching this film we all felt invigorated, like we were discovering new powers. One of us found herself sobbing with joy!” The jury also awarded an honourable mention to Adela Kaczmarek’s The Governance of Love.

The Colin Low Award for Canadian Documentary (presented by William F White) was awarded to Meryam Joobeur’s Gods, Weeds and Revolutions. Jury members Baljit Sangra, Kevin Eastwood, and Doreen Manuel stated: “Meryam is a new filmmaker, but with this film she demonstrates that she already possesses many of the qualities that mark a great documentarian: an eye for exquisite imagery, the ability to transport a viewer to a specific time and place, willingness to tackle important subject matter, and the bravery to share a deeply personal story with others.” In addition to this, the Jury wanted to recognize Dennis Allen's film Crazywater with an honourable mention. With his latest film, Dennis tells an incredibly brave and disarmingly personal story of alcohol and substance abuse among First Nations communities. It is hard to think of how a storyteller can be more courageous than to do what Dennis has done here.

The Nigel Moore Award for Youth Programming was awarded by Youth Jury members Anna Hetherington, Jacob Saltzberg, and Steven Hawkins, to Travis Rummel, Ben Knight, and Matt Stoecker’s film DamNation. In response, the filmmakers wrote: “It means a lot to us that DamNation appealed to a younger audience. We sincerely hope that Nigel would have loved our film—from what we’ve read about him, he might have appreciated the last words in DamNation by Edward Abbey: "Sentiment without action is the ruin of the soul.” The jury also awarded honourable mention to Daniel Roher’s film Resolute.

The Feature Documentary Award was given to Orlando von Einsiedel’s stunning work Virunga. Jury members Peter W. Klein, Kim Linekin and Yves J. Ma awarded the film the award on the basis of its cinematic power and the critical importance of its message. The jury also awarded an honourable mention to Talal Derki’s film Return to Homs.

Spotlight: Secrets & Lies

 

Vancouver, BC – Oh, the mendacity! From mass surveillance to little white lies, the consequences of deception and concealment are the focus of Secrets & Lies, our special Spotlight Program this year. The truth may be out there, but it is often buried in grey government documents, disclosed in secret meetings, and brokered in shady deals.

It is difficult to find a better or more important reminder of the necessity of speaking truth than our gala opening film Orlando von Einsiedel’s Virunga. In the verdant depths of Eastern Congo stands the Virunga National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site, and home to one of the last populations of mountain gorillas. But even in this most stunningly beautiful place, dark forces are at work.

Uncovering the facts demands courage, tenacity, and, often a willingness to get dirty. Long before Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden were uncovering government surveillance tactics, a group of activists were working to reveal the dirty tricks undertaken by Hoover’s FBI in Johanna Hamilton’s new film 1971. The story of a group of murdered Chinese miners, hidden for more than a century, comes to light in Vernon Lott and Jennifer Anderson’s Massacred for Gold. Samantha Grant’s film A Fragile Trust recounts the rise and fall of Jayson Blair, the world’s most infamous plagiarist. A perfect storm of disaster capitalism and corruption collides in a New Orleans hospital in Alex Glustrom’s Big Charity. Conspiracy theory has no bottom in John Lundberg, Mark Piklington, Roland Denning and Kypros Kyprianou’s Mirage Men, a film that probes the UFO community and discovers something out of this world. The secret geopolitical machinations behind the release of Nelson Mandela are detailed in Mandy Jacobson and Carlos Agulló’s Plot for Peace. Callum Macrae’s No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka documents the events that led to one of the worst atrocities in recent history.

“Art is a lie that makes us realize truth,” said Pablo Picasso. A number of films in our Spotlight program make wildly creative use of this edict, none more so than Anna Odell’s The Reunion, a film that plays hardball with reality in the ultimate act of high school revenge. In Dan Geller and Dayna Goldfine’s The Galapagos Affair: Satan Came to Eden the lethal conflagration of sex, Nietzsche and chicken soup comes to life through the voice talents of Cate Blanchett.

DOXA Documentary Film Festival runs May 2 –11, 2014. Tickets are available online at www.doxafestival.ca. For further information, call DOXA at 604.646.3200. DOXA is presented by The Documentary Media society, a Vancouver-based non-profit, charitable society.

Justice is Screened

 

Vancouver, BC – DOXA is very proud to offer the fifth annual Justice Forum. Since its introduction, the Justice Forum has grown and developed into one of DOXA’s most important programs. The 2014 Justice Forum films encompass a broad range of social justice issues, from government surveillance to domestic abuse. With support from CUPE BC, DOXA is proud to present this outstanding selection of films.

Crazywater, Dennis Allen’s raw and honest exploration of substance abuse among First Nations communities confronts the root causes of addiction, beginning with Dennis’s own experience. Charity Hospital in New Orleans was once the oldest continuously operating hospital in the US. But in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the State had other plans and declared the hospital unfit for operation in Big Charity. Jayson Blair’s plummet from the heights of newspaper journalism fame was well documented, even by the very newspaper that hired him, but the deeper truth remains unclear in A Fragile Trust: Plagiarism, Power and Jayson Blair at the New York Times.

Long before Edward Snowden or Chelsea Manning were turning out state secrets, a group of ordinary citizens were pulling back the rug to expose the dirty tricks of Hoover’s FBI in Johanna Hamilton’s 1971. The Belarus Free Theatre tackles any and all taboos, but especially those that are deemed off limits by Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko, one of Europe’s sole remaining dictators in Dangerous Acts Starring The Unstable Elements of Belarus. In 1887, more than thirty Chinese gold miners were massacred in Hells Canyon on the border between Oregon and Idaho. Their story is reconstructed in Massacred for Gold. Stanley Nelson captures the passion and commitment of the summer of 1964, when young people from across the US converged in Mississippi to help register black voters in Freedom Summer.

Domestic violence and victim blaming are confronted head on in Cynthia Hill’s powerful new film Private Violence. As the world continues to shrink, designers and architects are taking note and reinventing the very concept of the home in Jesper Wachtmeister’s Microtopia. When Cesar Chavez was sixty years old, the activist/union organizer embarked on his final and longest hunger strike to bring attention to the plight of farm workers in Cesar’s Last Fast.

DOXA Documentary Film Festival runs May 2 –11, 2014. Tickets are available online at www.doxafestival.ca. For further information, call DOXA at 604.646.3200. DOXA is presented by The Documentary Media society, a Vancouver-based non-profit, charitable society.

DOXA Gets Wild!

Vancouver, BC – The 2014 DOXA Documentary Film Festival ventures deep into the unknown, to seek out new forms of nonfiction, to discover glorious new forms of cinema, caught on the wing, and documented in the wild. From mountain gorillas to cartoon ponies and the men who love them, wild boars, roller derby grrrls, young agrarians and stick insects, all captured in their natural habitat. With more than 90 films, and 78 screenings, DOXA 2014 proves that documentary knows no bounds, as we boldly go where no one has gone before!

DOXA is proud to open the festival with Orlando von Einsiedel’s important and stunningly courageous film, Virunga. In the verdant depths of Eastern Congo stands Virunga National Park, a UNESCO world heritage site, and one of the most bio-diverse places in the world. But even in this most beautiful of places, human corruption and greed threatens destruction and death. A group of fiercely dedicated park rangers are the only people who stand in the way of the dark forces that seek unfettered access to all of the park’s rich natural resources.

George Takei started his career in film and television more than five decades ago, but he is still most familiar as Mr. Sulu, the helmsman of the Starship Enterprise. The decision to come out as a gay man, in active support of same-sex marriage, launched him into the public eye in a whole new way. In his 76th year, he has become an Internet meme! Jennifer M. Kroot’s delightful film, To be Takei, is a testimony to the power of speaking your truth to the world.

The freedom to love who and what you choose is also the animating spirit of our gala closing night film, A Brony Tale. Bronies are the male fans of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic. The brony phenomena has come to vivid life in colour, costumes, and social get-togethers. This is news to Ashleigh Ball, lead singer of the Vancouver Indie band Hey, Ocean!, and the voice actress for many of the show’s main characters. Brent Hodge’s pop ode to the brony culture is honest, good-hearted, and an insane amount of fun.

DOXA Documentary Film Festival runs May 2 –11, 2014. Tickets are available online at www.doxafestival.ca. For further information, call DOXA at 604.646.3200. DOXA is presented by The Documentary Media society, a Vancouver-based non-profit, charitable society.

Media contact: Marnie Wilson 604.836.2409 or [email protected]