Le Fond de l'air est rouge (A Grin Without a Cat) Parts 1 & 2

Le Fond de l'air est rouge (A Grin Without a Cat) Parts 1 & 2

Friday, May 12, 2017 - 5:00pm
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Chris Marker | 
France |
 1977 | 
180 minutes

THIS FILM IS PART OF THE FRENCH FRENCH PROGRAM. 

CINEMATHEQUE MEMBERS WILL RECEIVE A DOXA MEMBERSHIP FOR ALL 7 FOIS CHRIS MARKER SCREENINGS. 

  SCENES OF THE THIRD WORLD WAR 1967–1977

Some think the third World War will be set off by a nuclear missile. For me, that’s the way it will end. In the meantime, the figures of an intricate game are developing, a game whose decoding will give historians of the future — if they are still around — a very hard time. A weird game. Its rules change as the match evolves. To start with, the superpowers’ rivalry transforms itself not only into a Holy Alliance of the Rich against the Poor, but also into a selective co-elimination of Revolutionary Vanguards, wherever bombs would endanger sources of raw materials. As well as into the manipulation of these vanguards to pursue goals that are not their own. During the last ten years, some groups of forces (often more instinctive than organized) have been trying to play the game themselves - even if they knocked over the pieces. Wherever they tried, they failed. Nevertheless, it’s been their being that has the most profoundly transformed politics in our time. This film intends to show some of the steps of this transformation. -CHRIS MARKER

Here is Chris Marker’s magnum opus in all its ferocious intelligence and scale. Originally released in 1977, and reedited in 1996, the rise and fall of the Left is ostensibly Marker’s subject, the great political revolutions of the 60s and 70s, totemic figures like Che Guevara, Fidel Castro, composed like a heaving orchestra of archival material, demonstrations, occupations, and blood in the streets. A generation of filmmakers from Adam Curtis (HyperNormalization), to Patricio Guzman (Nostalgia for the Light), to Raoul Peck (I Am Not Your Negro) have Marker to thank for fashioning a different means of constructing narrative — febrile, alive, and fired with a deep, almost precognizant kind of curiosity. More relevant than it was even forty years earlier, this tour-de-force work is a guide, seemingly torn from the current moment, made up of the folly and greatness of the human experiment. Or as Marker says, summing up centuries of human struggle, history “always seems to have more imagination than we do.” -DW